Alzheimer's Genome Project™

New Tanzi Paper Identifies Two Late-Onset Gene Mutations

Posted: Sep. 20, 2013

In a paper just published in the prestigious journal Neuron, Harvard Medical School/Mass General Hospital Geneticist Dr. Rudy Tanzi, together with lead author, Dr. Jaehong Suh and their team, identified two rare mutations in the human gene called "ADAM10" that lead to the most common, late-onset variant of Alzheimer's. Tanzi's research suggests that the ADAM10 gene makes an enzyme called alpha-secretase, which cleaves the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) to prevent the formation of beta-amyloid, the toxic protein that triggers brain pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

Newly Identified Gene Variations Provide Clues About Origins of Alzheimer’s

Posted: Jun. 18, 2013

Research uncovering 12 new gene variations connected to the cause of the early-onset familial form of Alzheimer’s disease (EO-FAD), which generally strikes before the age of 65, is being published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease

Posted: Feb. 13, 2013

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund is grateful to President Obama for the Administration’s continued commitment to curing Alzheimer’s disease. With the implementation of the first ever National Plan To End Alzheimer’s Disease, to which Cure Alzheimer’s Fund was a contributor, and his specific targeting of the disease last night in the State of the Union address, President Obama has highlighted a national resolve to defeat this disease.

$5.4 Million Awarded for Research to Guide Alzheimer’s Drug Development

Posted: Oct. 18, 2012

Largest Single Private Investment in Alzheimer’s Whole Genome Sequencing Targets Effective Therapies and Cure: $5.4 Million Awarded for Research to Guide Alzheimer’s Drug Development

Understanding who is most susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease and developing early detection models, effective therapies and possibly a cure, is the goal of the largest single private scientific grant ever invested in Alzheimer’s Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) focused on families afflicted with the disease.